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The F-Market and Wharves line in San Francisco — along with its sister line, the E-Embarcadero — uses historic streetcars imported from cities around the world, from Mexico City to Melbourne, Birmingham to Baltimore, and a fleet of 53 streetcars operate through Market Street, San Francisco’s “Main Street”, as these go through the City’s main districts, including the Castro, Duboce Triangle, Civic Center, South of Market, Financial District, Ferry Building, The Embarcadero, and Fisherman’s Wharf.
For more information about these San Francisco streetcars, visit Market Street Railway’s website here.

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San Francisco Muni Rail Map. The lines depicted are in yellow (E-Embarcadero) and maroon (F-Market and Wharves).

San Francisco Muni-Themed Streetcars

San Francisco Muni operated dozens of streetcars on several lines, including lines operated today by Muni Metro (J, K, L, M, and N), and these vehicles have operated on other defunct lines, including A-Stockton and B-Geary lines. These vintage streetcars have been carrying thousands of San Franciscans for decades.
Streetcar 1 (1912)
Muni’s first-ever streetcar has been in service since 1912, the year San Francisco Muni’s operations went to the city government of San Francisco (thus, the first People’s System in the United States), and it was originally operated on the A-Stockton line that went through today’s Stockton Tunnel connecting Union Square and Chinatown. And, while the Stockton Tunnel has been replaced by trolleybus operations, this streetcar has survived many, many setbacks, from decommissioning of most of Muni’s streetcar lines up to its revival in 1983 for the San Francisco Historic Trolley Festival. Streetcar no. 1 is the original vehicle that brought Muni to life, and after 100 years of service, this special streetcar is still operational today, although it operates on a short version of the F-Market and Wharves line (between Fisherman’s Wharf and the Ferry Building).
Streetcar 162: San Francisco Muni 1950s Livery (1914)
This streetcar represents the last days of Muni’s original streetcar fleet, and it is painted in its last Muni livery, the Postwar “Wings” introduced in the late 1940s and kept until its retirement in 1958. It ran on virtually all of Muni’s streetcar lines, in which it was seen a lot on the H-Van Ness and Potrero line through Fort Mason. It was a display piece at the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Riverside County before it was reacquired by the Market Street Railway and Muni in 2003. Along with Streetcar 1, Streetcar 162 also operates on a short version of the F-Market and Wharves line, and it and Streetcar 1 are used occasionally to bring tourists around the remaining streetcar lines of San Francisco.
Streetcar 578: Market Street Railway Company (1896)
While it looks like a cable car, this unique vehicle is actually a functioning electric streetcar. This contraption is one of the oldest surviving streetcars in the world, bearing the old “Ellis & O’Farrell Streets” text, with Devisadero (now called Divisadero Street) as part of its route description. It is usually brought out yearly during San Francisco Muni’s Heritage Festival where this and many other historical streetcars (minus the PCCs) operate free services along The Embarcadero for everyone to enjoy.

PCC Streetcars

These round-nosed streetcars have operated on many North American cities, from San Diego to Savannah, in which these were used as a main form of public transportation in the inner cities until the late 1950s when the freeway system was built, prompting many of the streetcar operators to shut down services and made the United States and automobile-centric country.

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Illinois Terminal (suburban St. Louis)

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San Francisco Muni (1940s)

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Philadelphia Suburban Railroad

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Los Angeles Railway

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Minneapolis-St. Paul

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Brooklyn

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Newark

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Los Angeles Transit Lines

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San Diego

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Boston (repainted)

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Pittsburgh

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Los Angeles (Pacific Electric)

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San Francisco Muni (1950s)

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El Paso, TX – Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

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Louisville

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Detroit

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Chicago

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Washington, D.C.

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Boston (old paint)

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Philadelphia (1938)

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San Francisco (1960s, repainted)

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Dallas

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Philadelphia (post-war livery)

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San Francisco Muni (1960s), old paint)

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Birmingham

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Cleveland

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Baltimore

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Toronto

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Cincinnati

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Mexico City (old paint)

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PCC Streetcar Interior

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Mexico City (repainted)

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Kansas City

World Streetcars

Aside from the American-built streetcars, San Francisco also operates unique streetcars imported from multiple cities around the world. Of these, the Milan streetcar is the most visible as five of them are used on regular service; the others are typically used as either charters or taken out during special events.
Blackpool Open-Air Boat Streetcars
Two of these streetcars operate with San Francisco Muni. Imported from Blackpool in the United Kingdom, these open-air vehicles are the most popular of the dozens of historic streetcars in operation, especially with large groups and private charters.
Milan Streetcars
These box-type streetcars, imported from Milan, Italy, have distinctive sounds that many complain of its screeching noise, especially when these approach stoplights. Its signature horn, however, compensates as its distinct feature for these rather narrow-shaped vehicles.
Pre-1930s Livery (Yellow and White)
1930s-1970s Livery (Green)
1970s-Present Livery (Orange)
Melbourne Streetcar (W-Class Tram)
This streetcar, imported from Melbourne, Australia, was originally built by Moore for the Melbourne and Metropolitan Tramways Board in 1928, and it was acquired by Muni in 1983 as Melbourne switched its older W2 class trams for more modern vehicles.
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